This edition from Simon and Schuster has been totally revised with expanded teachings and a study guide. Available in stores and online now!


   
Connect with Clare and others
about the book


Read what these people are saying about The 10 Second Rule
Click Here to Read Their Endorsements


  • Bill Hybels
  • Joni Eareckson Tada
  • Chip Ingram
  • Ed Dobson
  • Dick DeVos
  • Betty Huizenga
  • John Ortberg
  • Joe Stowell
  • David Green
  • Jim Samra
  • John Guest
  • Bob Buford
  • And More...
Free Resources (more)



4079 Park East Court, Suite 102
Grand Rapids, MI 49546
P. 616-942-0041
E.

The 10 Second Rule™ is a registered trademark.
Comments & Privacy Policy
Terms & Conditions
3

The Dangers of Claiming Promises, God Never Made to You
Posted by Clare
Send This Post to a Friend Send This Post to a Friend

Claiming_Promises

A few years back, I met with a man considering a new job in California, moving there with his family. While the job and move sounded exciting, something he said set off alarm bells in my spirit.

When I asked him questions about the affordability of housing, schools for his children and his wife’s thoughts on the move, he dismissed most of them with this statement.

“I’m just going by faith, like Abraham and his family. God brought him to a new country and prospered. We’re going to just trust God to do the same for us.”

My reply startled him. “But did God specifically tell you to go to California? Did he promise you, that if you went, he’d cause you to prosper with the kind of clarity he gave Abraham?” Obviously, he admitted God had not. Then made this observation; “There are some things you should never trust God for.” “Like what?” he asked with real skepticism.

Christians should never trust God to deliver on a promise he never made to you personally, or to all believers for all time. God made all kinds of promises to Old Testament people and to the nation of Israel that were specific to them, and therefore cannot be “claimed” by Christians today. Promises like;

  • God promised Israel that he would give them the land of Canaan for their own. But, I’ve heard pastors use that promise to begin a new church or mission project in a hostile country.
  • In Malachi God promised Israel that he would “throw open the floodgates of heaven” (Malachi 3:10), if they were faithful with their tithes and offerings. I’ve heard Christians claim this promise regarding their own giving, which is only a few clicks away from prosperity theology.
  • God told Adam and Eve to be “fruitful and multiply” because God wanted more people to populate the earth. I’ve heard Christians use that to justify large families today. Obviously, the world no longer needs more people.

Please don’t misunderstand me. God loves it when Christians live by faith. But, I’ve actually seen people’s faith die or diminish when they claimed a promise God never made to them, and God didn’t deliver.

So, here are some questions I’ve found helpful to ask before I’d encourage anyone to claim a promise from God:

  1. Did God make a promise in the Bible that you’d like to claim for yourself, to a specific person, or is it very clear it was that “your” promise was to all believers, for all time?
    Context is everything! Understanding why, and to whom God made any promise, is critical before claiming it for our own. We can learn a lot about the character and purposes of God from his promises to others, even if they aren’t made to us.
  2. Was this a promise to Israel, the nation, or to all believers in God?
    When God promised the land to Israel, he didn’t extend that offer to us, Christians. When God promised he’d drive out all Israel’s enemies, that promise does not apply to any other Christian nation. These were promises to Israel, for Israel.
  3. Is the promise you’re claiming, actually a “proverb” or wisdom from God?
    The Bible says “Train up a child in the way they should go and they will not depart from it.” (Proverbs 22:6). Frankly, I know many people who grew up in great Christian homes who “departed” from the faith or lived immoral lives.The Proverbs quote isn’t a promise. It’s a general observation. Generally speaking good parents will produce good children. That’s why the book of Proverbs is listed in the genre of “wisdom literature.”
  4. If God doesn’t deliver on his “promise” to you, will you consider him unfaithful?
    God always keeps his promises. So if he doesn’t answer or deliver, are you prepared to admit your mistake so family and friends do not blame God for being unfaithful to his promise?Here’s why this is important. I can’t tell you the number of men I’ve met with over the years who walked away from God because he didn’t cure their dying child, save their parents marriage, or take away some addiction or long standing sin. So take care, not to put words in God’s mouth that makes him look anything other than totally faithful to all his promises.

How following Jesus works in real life.

If you found this blog and are not a regular subscriber,
you can take care of that right HERE.

Send This Post to a Friend Send This Post to a Friend
Share on Twitter
Share on Facebook
Would You Like to Subscribe to this Blog
Comments (3)
Comments
  1. Jim McNaughton said...

    Thank you for this post, you are making me think about why I tithe. I started tithing shortly after becoming a Christian, and I have always thought of Malachi as teaching that if you tithe, God will bless you (though not necessarily with money). I can see that I may be superstitious instead of “honoring God with my increase.” Thank you for starting this chain of thought…

    Reply
    • Clare said...

      Jim,for sure God does honor faithfulness with money. My reservations about Malachi are two fold; First God was talking directly to Israel about the specific tithes he required of them, that they were withholding from him, which was a sin for them. Christians today have no obligation to obey those specific tithes.
      I’ve used Malachi to encourage Christians to “give, so they get.” That is the wrong reason to give. Nowhere in the New Testament are Christians encouraged to give, so they can get even more in return from God. Thank you for your sensitivity to this issue.

      Reply
      • Jim McNaughton said...

        I used to pray “Santa Claus” prayers. Now I pray that God will give me what I need to fulfill the mission he has given me and my family. He will always do that because he takes responsibility for us when we put him first.

        As far as tithing, someone has said they recommend giving anything but 10% – so that you have to interact with God and get his will, not just relying on someone else’s formula.

        Reply
Leave a Comment
To leave a comment on this post, please fill out the form below.






Hey, let's talk about a few ground rules so this will be a great experience for all of us.

1. I reserve the right to delete or not post comments that in my opinion are not God-honoring, critical of any person, or off topic. If in doubt, please read My Comments and Privacy Policy.

2. I require an email address with every comment, or post for accountability, but it won't be displayed with your post.

3. I'll never sell or share any user’s email address or personal information collected from comments, posts, subscriptions or gathered from purchases from our store.

4. Please do your best to keep comments or postings brief, or they may not be posted.